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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Muskegon
    Posts
    2,081

    Deep Cycle Batteries

    Hey guys - I had to get 2 new 27 Group deep cycle batteries for my bow mount trolling motor and was quite surprised to see the wide price difference out there.

    Low price Menards $74.99 (Excide)
    Next Wallyworld $79.97 (Everstart)
    Next Sears $98.99 (Die Hard)
    Autozone $116.99 (Duralast)

    All 1 yr full replacement warranty.

    If you need to get new batteries it sure pays to shop around and ask if your favorite guys will do a price match. I saved a bundle!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Sidney mi
    Posts
    160
    I get the ones from Menard's.they work all right as long as you never get below 10 volts before you charge them. You want to look at the amp hour not the cca .How about ever start? 2 yr warranty 130$ 114 amp hours @ 1 amp

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Marquette, MI
    Posts
    19
    Interstate green top. I've had good performance out of mine and several of the good charter guys I know use them. I have also heard great things about the optimas. Also made by interstate, but about 2x the price. Not sure on the current price but the interstate is probably higher than what's on your list.
    When it comes down to price per year. I think the better the battery the less the price per year cost. Wallyworlds neverstarts are guaranteed to crap out within a year of when the warranty expires. I don't have experience with the others on your list. You get what you pay for.
    I'd buy the best batteries you can afford AND have an onboard charger to keep them fully charged in fishing season and the off season.

    You won't be excited about the hundred bucks you saved on cheap batteries when they fail on the water.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Kiel, WI
    Posts
    524
    I use the Walmart "EverStart Maxx" (three in my walleye boat) they call a 29 but it's the same size as there 27. It is $99, has a two year warranty, is concidered dual purpose, and they performed flawless. Ratings are better then anything else I found in that price range...... I have three Intertstae Green Tops in the Salmon boat and no complaints but they don't get near the work out the EverStarts do with trolling motor use. I've also had Optima's and wouldn't pay an extra dollars to get one.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Muskegon
    Posts
    2,452
    Well most of the batteries listed above are not deep cycle batteries for a starter. They are mostly dual purpose AGM batteries a true Deep Cycle battery is built different and requires regular maintenance. It is not hard to get 10 or more years out of a quality deep cycle battery. It is tough to get 3 years out of many of the off the shelf batteries most people buy. in most cases you get what you pay for here is my choice but you will gag at the price. I have had these last well over 10 years with regular maintenance. http://www.atbatt.com/trojan-scs225-...ing-series.asp Does that mean you can't ruin them heck no I can however ruin any battery on your list in a matter of days.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Kiel, WI
    Posts
    524
    Specs don't look that much different then the EverStart Maxx, what makes that a deep cycle anymore then the EverStart?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Muskegon
    Posts
    2,452
    All the EverStarts I have seen are sealed AGM batteries that is the difference. True Deep Cycle batteries don't make good starting batteries so that is a one issue. The Trojan I showed has heavy plates like a Deep Cycle is a flooded wet cell so you can maintain it and over the years I have found them to last 10 years or more if you maintain them. Most of the RV Marine batteries are simply car batteries with slightly heavier plates to gain some reserve capacity. When you use the term deep cycle what your actually talking about is a battery like those found in forklifts large wet cell batteries designed for lifelong use. If you have a good charging system you can get by with nearly any battery. But on a trolling motor you would be better off with a quality deep cycle unless your charging them off the main engine wile running. On my 14ft I took 2 of the Delco group 24 marine batteries off and replaced them with 2 of the 9G golf cart batteries which are 6v each. This doubled my trolling motor time. While on paper it should of been only a slight improvement. 225ah vs 210ah. But regardless of the on paper the on water tells me I have much more battery power. I am sure you will get pretty good use of the cheaper batteries on paper the answer will come on the water. Every year this same discussion comes up and my answers are pretty much the same every year. I am not suggesting the exact battery I showed just that the design is geared for a much longer lifespan. The Trojan battery is also 5 lbs heavier that extra weight is heavier plates which add to life of a battery and increase it's cycle life and reserve capacity.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    South Range, WI
    Posts
    20
    If I ever get my Ideal last boat I would go with an Odyssey Battery, I currently use a PC680 in my T-Bucket I built.

    Their batteries are a dry cell, I can take my battery out and throw it in a snow bank for the winter. They run a higher charge of 14.5V but my Alternator runs that. You can mount it any direction except up-side down. This is winter 3 for mine, I do not keep it on charge over the winter, just leave it under the seat.
    221 Starcraft Islander 1979 vintage.
    Call sign: Up Nort
    Nuttin like a fine tuned Bucket
    1926 Model "T" Pickup

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    WI
    Posts
    112
    1Maniac is on track with his comments. The best thing I ever did regarding batteries (for 3 boats) is to get hooked up with a commercial battery wholesaler that handles everything from lift trucks to golf carts and boat/marina dealers. I've found over 30 yrs. of fishing that when it comes to real, deep cycle lead/acid batteries group 27 and up; Trojans are very good batteries if you keep them watered and properly charged. And they are HEAVY because of the plate size. Another solid manufacturer at a very good price point is Deka, which is what is in my boats now. http://www.dekabatteries.com/default.aspx?pageid=468

    If you maintain your batteries winter & summer and have them firmly strapped down, you should have no problem getting 4-6 yrs. or more; especially if your charging system is doing what its supposed to, you keep electrolyte up and you run a charger that has a "de-sulfate" cycle that keeps the plates fresh.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Wilbraham ma.
    Posts
    2,748
    Don't mean to hijack this thread,but can someone answer this question for me,as I know very little about the intricate technical aspects of batteries.

    *If I run my 350 I/O motor on my deep cycle battery,will the charging system shorten the life of the battery??.

    I say this because I run two interstate grp27 batteries,1 starting,and 1 Deep cycle.Many times,I forget to switch back to the starting battery when we're done trolling.So,I'll mistakenly start and run back to the dock with the deep cycle.
    We fish offshore fairly often,so the runs can be somewhat long.

    The local boatyard tells me that the charging system of the I/O will ruin a deep cycle battery,because they are made to be run down completely, then brought up to full charge.
    He claims keeping them constantly charged is not good.

    I know that deep cycle batteries can take deep discharges and be recharged over and over,(something which would shorten the life of a regular battery)but why would keeping it constantly charged ruin it?
    John R.
    * Boat #1 23' SeaCraft Tsunami
    * Boat #2 20' SeaCraft Seafari
    * Port- Olcott NY.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    My House
    Posts
    1,944
    John,

    Starting batteries are meant to discharge quickly and charge quickly. Deep cycle are meant to discharge slowly and charge slowly. ( in general ) I think in your situation a battery combiner would work well. It will charge the starting battery first and then top off the deep cycle when it can. I don't think your charging system is really going to hurt your deep cycle batteries from a charging standpoint but I would not recommend starting the engine with that battery unless you have to in an emergency. I also don't see a problem keeping your batteries charging if you have a good smart charger and the batteries are able to be serviced (add distilled water). I don't care for the maintenance free garbage. The short charge and discharge cycles are probably not a problem for people like us who only get a few hundreds cycles over the life of a battery. I would venture to bet that a cheaper battery paired with a good smart charger will outlast a high quality battery which is poorly taken care of or improperly utilized. Look into getting a small smart charger and just plug it in overnight. Ctek, Noco, Battery Tender all make something like this. Most also have a maintenance function which is good to hook up to your batteries periodically over the winter. Holler if you have more questions. I'll be seeing you guys the Friday before Memorial day.

    Cheers!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Ellison Bay, WI
    Posts
    5,138
    Quote Originally Posted by big easy View Post
    Don't mean to hijack this thread,but can someone answer this question for me,as I know very little about the intricate technical aspects of batteries.

    *If I run my 350 I/O motor on my deep cycle battery,will the charging system shorten the life of the battery??.

    I say this because I run two interstate grp27 batteries,1 starting,and 1 Deep cycle.Many times,I forget to switch back to the starting battery when we're done trolling.So,I'll mistakenly start and run back to the dock with the deep cycle.
    We fish offshore fairly often,so the runs can be somewhat long.

    The local boatyard tells me that the charging system of the I/O will ruin a deep cycle battery,because they are made to be run down completely, then brought up to full charge.
    He claims keeping them constantly charged is not good.

    I know that deep cycle batteries can take deep discharges and be recharged over and over,(something which would shorten the life of a regular battery)but why would keeping it constantly charged ruin it?
    I've always heard this too. I'd heard the different design required a different approach to recharging. Seemed logical as I have an old battery charger that has a special setting for deep cycle batteries. I think the plates may be constructed of a different "metal".

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Muskegon
    Posts
    2,452
    Ok while it is true all batteries have charge rate requirements Wet Cell batteries are most forgiving as long as you water them. AGM and Gell Cell batteries are very picky about their charge voltage and requirements. This is because heavy battery use produces heat as does fast charging at high rates they do not have the ability to dissipate the heat like a wet cell so high charge rates damage them. 10.6v is considered a dead battery in a 12v battery running a battery down to 10.6 and recharging it is considered a cycle Deep cycle batteries are designed to do this on a regular basis. You can leave a deep cycle battery on a charger forever as long as you maintain the water level. People do it in RV's every day the ones that maintain the battery have no issues the ones that don't spend money in the shop all the time and complain about the crap batteries they bought. Many of the battery chargers have settings for deep cycle because true deep cycle is a wet cell and wet cell batteries will take a equalization charge which is a higher voltage burst charge at the end of the charge cycle to clean the plates and equalize the cell voltage. Sealed AGM and automotive type batteries cannot do this and will be damaged by it. If you have good charge voltage regulation you can use the sealed batteries and get good life out of them. One thing you should do is monitor your charging system voltage many older systems would charge as high as 16v and will ruin a sealed battery in a hurry. When customers ask me to recommend a battery I have a list of questions first is will you spend any time checking your battery? Second is what charging systems do you use? 3rd is what do you expect the battery to do? last is what is your budget?
    If your going to invest both time and money into maintaining your battery you have lots of options. If your gonna close the hood and forget it then your options went down.

    In boats and RV's most people have more than one charging system usually the engine and a onboard charger when they are plugged in. You have to know what they charge like and the voltage regulation of them to pick the right battery.

    For a happy life you have to have the right size battery or batteries a battery that is too small will always fail too soon. One that is too big is extra expense and weight you must carry. Lets say you have used a small group 24 in your boat for years with no problem you will see no gain by using a bigger battery. However if you just bought a bigger bow mount trolling motor then you probably need bigger batteries to run it. so you have to know what your needs are.

    Finally what is your budget once we know your wants and needs you get to choose from a range of batteries. in some cases that range might be small or large but usually you will have choices to make. In many cases the choice will be in name brand and warranty. As mentioned there are only 3 major battery manufactures in the country but any of them will gladly produce a battery with your label on it. However often that would mean your the only warranty center for them. Like for many years you could only get a GM battery warranty covered at a GM dealership. You can't take a NAPA battery to Walmart for a warranty even though it is the same battery with a different label. So sometimes brand name is important esp if you travel because a battery that is only warrantied at Bob's beer house in your home town is useless any where else.

    Hope that helps

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    My House
    Posts
    1,944
    Well said Maniac

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Holland, MI
    Posts
    52
    I had researched batteries very heavily about 10 years ago and reached the same conclusions as the well written posts by Maniac. There may be many different brands of batteries but there are only a couple of manufactures in the US so all brands come from these sites unless they are from China. This is very logical because the manufacturing process is not exactly environmentally friendly. So if you are comparing starting batteries or deep cycle batteries, specs will likely be comparable because they are likely manufactured by the same plant. I owned two sets of Trojans and can attest to their beefy plates and overall weight. My battery location does not allow for easy access and service and unfortunately, I neglected a very good product. I know run a sealed mat battery and charge them properly. It fits my craft better due to the access issue and I have the luxury of starting on shore power. But for a true deep cycle battery, and you must service these frequently, Trojans would be my recommendation.

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