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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hastings, MN
    Posts
    59

    Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    Someone told me to soak salmon fillets in milk for 1/2 - 1 hour after thawing. Asked why, and they couldn't give me a solid answer. He said that it enhances flavor? Any feedback?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Paw Paw, Michigan
    Posts
    9,069

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    It is supposed to remove the "fishiness" but heck if I know whether it's true or not. I like to use some powdered buttermilk in my batter mix--wonder if that does the same.

    Dave Mull
    Editor/Associate Publisher
    Great Lakes Angler Magazine
    Boat Name: TrollBoy
    Home Port: New Buffalo, MI

    "Save the Alewives!"

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Ovid, Mi
    Posts
    195

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    I have had fillets feel mushy after thawing out, soak them in milk and they firm up. I usually soak them overnight, but when I do a fish fry it is usually for 10-20 people.

    As far as removing fishiness? I think that's all in the way the fish is cleaned.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 1999
    Location
    Paw Paw, Michigan
    Posts
    9,069

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    >I have had fillets feel mushy after thawing out, soak them in
    >milk and they firm up. I usually soak them overnight, but when
    >I do a fish fry it is usually for 10-20 people.
    >
    >As far as removing fishiness? I think that's all in the way
    >the fish is cleaned.

    whatadeal: I couldn't agree more about proper care and cleaning to avoid fishiness.

    Keep that fish cold, too!

    Dave Mull
    Editor/Associate Publisher
    Great Lakes Angler Magazine
    Boat Name: TrollBoy
    Home Port: New Buffalo, MI

    "Save the Alewives!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Medicine Lake, MN
    Posts
    791

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    We always soak salmon we deep fry in 7-up for a couple of hours. Try it, it works great. Chris
    Pioneer

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    11

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    I will second the 7-up post, only we use diet 7-up. All fish we catch to into diet 7-up after we clean them. Works like a charm

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Hastings, MN
    Posts
    59

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    Why diet 7-up? Does it add flavor. Do you do this for smoking also?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Medicine Lake, MN
    Posts
    791

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    I don't do it for smoking, I don't think you need to. It takes away some of the "fishy" taste when you fry.
    Pioneer

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    7

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    Another trick that they use in restaurants is to soak your fillets (any type) in ice water that has a tsp. of salt and 2 tbsp. of baking soda in the bowl. I learned this from a chef many years ago. Never let your fillets get too warm with the aid of ice water and the above solution, and your fish will taste great, even if it's been in the freezer for an extended period of time.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Marquette, Mi,United States
    Posts
    1,586

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    All these techniques have bacteriacidal effects and ph buffering effects. The7UP treatment is a carbonic acid bath, a bit like a weak ceviche. Milk and baking soda, esentially the same thing. Salt added to water will both kill bacteria, arrest bacterial growth and increase isotonicity of the water, causing a net movement of water out of the fish tissue, firming the fish. Milk contains lactic acid, which will kill bacteria,breakdown the collagen connective tissue and initiate protein deamination.

    All brining/pickling/ceviche type applications. The fishiness in fish is the result of bacterial decomposition and fatty acid oxidation-both bad. Rinsing your fillets initiates the process. Getting fish blood on them also imparts a bad taste since the pH of blood in dead fish has a high free CO2 content, shifting pH downward. Three ways to destroy or deaminate proteins:low pH, high heat,enzymatic exposure and degredation. Fish fillets are mostly protein.

    MSU FOOD Science Department
    Best way to prep salmon for the table: fillet as cleanly as possible, avoiding blood spillage and GI tract/kidney punctures. Pat fillets dry with paper towels. Place in Foodsaver bags and seal. Minimize water contact and keep them cold prior freezing. Treat your cleaning/cutting board surface prior filleting to a good dose of sunlight (UV) or bleach to kill back the bacteria in all the crevices and cuts. Give it a try, you will be amazed at the taste difference.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Mishawaka,Indiana
    Posts
    209

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    Thirsty Whaler you are saying not to freeze your filets in water. I have done this for years. The salmon meat does seem to be a little mushy after thawing. If i don't have a food saver what would you wreak a mend an don't want a food saver. I always soke the meat in salt or 7-up over night then put water in the freezer bag with the fish and freeze them but not let them go over a year before eating them.

    Thanks,jawbusters

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    7

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    An old restaurant trick is to soak your thawed filets in ice water to which you add 1 tsp of salt and 2 tbsp. of baking soda. I do this to all of my filets immediatly following the thawing process. I put the bowl in the fridge until it's time to cook the filets.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Marquette, Mi,United States
    Posts
    1,586

    RE: Soaking salmon fillets in milk?

    Commercial packing ships use a water mist and flash freeze technique to coat a fish fillet with several thin layers of frozen water after cleaning. This limits oxygen access to the fillet and slows the rate the fat portion oxidizes-creating that rancid smell and taste. If I don't have access to my vacuum sealer, I freeze in as small a volume of water I can add to cover the fillet. A friend loads his fillets in a zip-loc and then immerses the bag in a bucket of water to force the majority of air out of the bag and then seals it. He maintains he gets the same volume of air away from his fillets as xyz sealers. Every once in a while I consider trying to get a pool going to purchase a good commercial grade vacuum sealer for marina wide use, but that idea dies a slow death each summer.

    Throwing a thawed fish fillet in salted water will cause a net movement of water out of the fish fillet to eventually reach an equilibrium isotonicity with the fillet, firming it.

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